TNPSC GENERAL ENGLISH

PART - B

ALLITERATION

The repetition of an initial consonant sound*. It depends on the sound and not on repetition of letters.

*The sound of English alphabets except vowels (a, e, i, o, u).

A Psalm of Life

SENTENCE
Tell me not, in mournfulnumbers  m
Tell me not, in mournful numbers  n
For the soul is dead that slumbers  s
And the grave is not its goal  g
Was not spoken of the soul  s
But to act, that each to-morrow  t
Find us farther than to-day  f
In the world’s broad field of battle  b
Be not like dumbdrivencattle  d
Sailing o’er life’s solemn main  s
With a heart for any fate;  f
Learn to labor and to wait  l


Women’s Rights

SENTENCE
You cannot rob us of the rights we cherish  r  
We claim to dwell, in quiet and seclusion  k
As humble plants by country hedgerows growing  h
And yield in odours, ere the day’s declining  d
To die, and not a heart that does not love us  d

The Nation United

 SENTENCE
Mark’d how to explore the vacant vast surrounding  v
It launch’d forth filament, filament, filament, out of itself  f
And you O my soul where you stand  s
Surrounded, detached, in measureless oceans of space  s
Ceaselessly musing, venturing, throwing, seeking the spheresto connect them  s
Till the gossamer thread you fling catch somewhere, O my soul  s

English Words

 SENTENCE
You bleached our souls soiledwith impurities  s
Of a purer, drearier, delight  d
You were the dawn, and sunlight filled the spaces  s
O winged seeds! You crossed the furrowed seas  s
winging words! Like homing bees you borrow  w, b
Sweetened within our soulsfor aeons bright  s
The burthen of a wanelesswinterless spring  w

Snake

SENTENCE
In the deep, strange-scentedshade of the great dark carob-tree  s
He reached down from a fissure in the earth-wall in the gloom  f
And trailed his yellow-brown slackness soft-bellied down  s
He sipped with his straightmouth  s
Softly drank through his straight gums, into his slacklong body,  s
And flickered his two-forked tongue from his lips, and mused a  t
Being earth-brown, earth-golden from the burning bowels of the  b
On the day of Sicilian July, with Etna smoking  s
For in Sicily the black, black snakes are innocent, the gold are venomous  s
And voices in me said: If you were a man  m
How glad I was he had come like a guest in quiet, to drink at my  g
And depart peacefulpacified, and thankless,  p
Into the burning bowels of this earth  b
Was it humility, to feel so honoured  h
From out the dark door of the secret earth  d
And lifted his head, dreamily, as one who has drunken,  d
And flickered his tongue like a forked night on the air,  f
Seeming to lick his lips,  l
And climb again the broken bank of my wall-face  b
And as he put his head into that dreadful hole  h
into that horrid black hole   h
At which, in the intense stillnoon, I stared with fascination  s
I despised myself and the voices of my accursed human education  m
And I wished he would come back, my snake  v
And so, I missed my chance with one of the lords  m

The Man He Killed

 SENTENCESOUND REPEATED
Had he and I but met  h
I shot at him as he at me  h
Or help to half-a-crown  h

Off to Outer Space Tomorrow Morning

 SENTENCE
You can start the CountDown, you can take a last look  k, l
You can pass me my helmetfrom its plastic hook  h
There won’t be any calendar, there won’t be any clock  k
I’ll doze when I’m sleepy and wake without a knock  v
For with nobody to visit me and not a friend in hail  n
In solit’ry confinement as complete as any gaol  c
When my capsule door is sealed and my space-flight has begun  s
With the teacups circlinground me like the planets round the sun  s
Tracking through your telescope my upward shooting star  t

Sonnet no.116

 SENTENCESOUND REPEATED
Let me not to the marriage of true minds  m
Or bends with the remover to remove  r
Within his bending sickle’s compass come  c
never writ, nor noman ever lov’d  n

The Solitary Reaper

 SENTENCE
And sings a melancholy strain  s
No nightingale did ever chaunt  n
More welcome notes to weary bands  v
Among Arabian sands  a
Breaking the silence of the seas  s
Will no one tell me whatshe sings  v
Perhaps the plaintivenumbers flow  p
For old, unhappy, far-off things  f
Some natural sorrow, loss, or pain  s
saw her singing at her work  s
The music in my heart I bore  m

Be the Best

 SENTENCE
Be a scrub in the valley – but be  b
The best little scrub by the sideof the rill  b
Be a bush, if you can’t be a tree  b
If you can’t be a bushbe a bitof the grass  b
And some highway happiermake  h
If you can’t be a muskie, then just be a bass  b
But the liveliest bass in the lake  b
We can’t all be captains, we’ve got to be crew  c
If you can’t be the sun, be a star  s
Be the best of whatever you are  b

O Captain! My Captain!

 SENTENCE
The ship has weather’d every rack, the prize we sought is won  v
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting  p
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring  v
Rise up – for you the flag is flung – for you the bugle trills  f
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning  t
It is some dream that on the deck  d
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will f, n
The ship is anchor’d safe and sound, its voyage closed and done  s
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won  f

Laugh and be Merry

 SENTENCE
Laugh and be merry, remember, better the world with a song  w
Better the world with a blow in the teeth of a wrong  w
Laugh, for the time is brief, a thread the length of a span  l
Laugh and be proud to belong to the old proud pageant of man  P
Made them, and filled them full with the strong red wine of  f
The splendid joy of the stars: the joy of the earth  s
So we must laugh and drinkfrom the deep blue cup of the sky  d
Join the jubilant song of the great stars sweeping by  j, s
Laugh and be merry together, like brothers akin  b

Earth

 SENTENCE
How perfect your obedience to the light and how noble is your submission to the sun  s
On the plains I have discovered your dreams  d
How strong is your yearningfor  y
We pierce your bosom with swords and spears  s
And you dress our wounds with oils and balsam  v
We empty our wastes in your bosom, and you fill  v
Our thrashing floors with wheat sheaves  v
Cannons and bombs but out of  b
The longing in my heart, the everlasting life in my soul!  l
Had it not been for my being  b

Don’t Quit

 SENTENCE
When things go wrong, as they sometimes will  v
And you want to smile, but you have to sigh  s
Life is queer with its twists and turns t
Don’t give up though the pace seems slow  S
And you never can tell how close you are  C
So, stick to the fight when you’re hardest hit  h
It’s when things seem worst that you must not quit w,  

  t

The Apology

 SENTENCE
That I walk alone in grove and glen  g
go to the god of the wood  g
Fold my arms beside the brook  b
For the idle flowers I brought  f
But ’tis figured in the flowers  f
But birds tell it in the bowers  b
One harvest from thy field  f

Be Glad Your Nose Is On Your Face

 SENTENCE
not pasted on some other place  p
for if it were where it is not  w
you might dislike your nose a lot  y
for you’d be forced to smell your feet  f
it soon would drive you to despair  d
for when you were obliged to sneeze  w
your brain would rattle from the breeze  b
Your nose, instead, through thick and thin  t

A Sonnet for My Incomparable Mother

 SENTENCE
I often contemplate my childhood, Mom  C
Hard work is mixed together with the fun  W
You learned that when you raised me long ago  L
think of all the things you gave to me  T
All these you spent on me throughout the years  T
You loved me with a never-failing love  L
You gave me strength and sweet security  S
And then you did the hardest thing of all:  T
You let me separate and setme free  S
Every day, I try my best to be  B
mother like the mom you were to me  M

The Flying Wonder

 SENTENCE
Said Orville Wright to Wilbur Wright  v
About the fun of flying  f
And then they built another  t
They sometimes skinned their noses  s
The first real aeroplane reallyflew  r
And kingdoms may forget their kings  k
Will men forget the Wrights  v

To a Millionaire

 SENTENCE
And thou in the midst of it with brows that gleam  t
A creature of that old distorted dream  d
Good men perform just deeds, and brave men die  d
And win not honour such as gold can give  g
While the vain multitudes plod on, and live  v
Old age and youth alike mistaughtmisfed  m
By want and rags and homelessness made vile  v

The Piano

 SENTENCE
Softly, in the dusk, a woman is singing to me  s
Taking me back down the vista of years, till I see  t
A child sitting under the piano, in the boom of the tingling strings  s
And pressing the small, poised feet of a mother who smiles as she sings.  s
In spite of myself, the insidious mastery of song  m
Betrays me back, till the heart of me weeps to belong  b
To the old Sunday evenings at home, with winter outside  w
So now it is vain for the singerto burst into clamour  s
With the great black piano appassionato. The glamour  g
Of childish days is upon me, my manhood is cast  m

Manliness

 SENTENCE
If you can dream and not make dreams your master  m
If you can think and not make thoughts your aim  t
And treat those twoimpostors just the same  t
Except the will which says to them, “Hold on”  v
With sixty seconds’ worth of distant run  v, s
And what is more, you’ll be a manmy son  m

Going for Water

 SENTENCE
The well was dry beside the door  d
And so we went with pail and can  w
To seek the brook if still it ran  s
And by the brook our woods werethere  v
We ran as if to meet the moon  m
The barren boughs without the leaves  b
Without the birds, without the breeze  b
But once within the woodwepaused  v
Ready to run to hiding new  r
With laughter when she found us soon  v
A slender tinkling falll that made  t

The Cry Of The Children

 SENTENCE
‘For oh,’ say the children, ‘we are weary,   w
If we cared for any meadows, it were merely   m
To dropdown in them and sleep.   d
Our knees tremble sorely in the stooping   s
We fall upon our faces, trying to go;   f
Through the coal-dark, underground   t
Or, all day, we drive the wheels of iron   d
Till our hearts turn,—our head, with pulses burning,   h
Turns the long light that droppeth down the wall—   d
‘O ye wheels,’ (breaking out in a mad moaning)   m
‘Stop! be silent for to-day!’ ‘   s

Migrant bird

 SENTENCE
Through fears and fright I flymy flight  f
No maps, no boundaries to block  b
spawn and splash in distant spills  s
breed my brood where’r I will  b
won’t look down. No I willnot  v
With speed of wings I hasten past  v
To dream my dreams and make them last  m

Shilpi

 SENTENCESOUND REPEATED
mirror of his changing moods  m
Sinews taut yet steady  s
He steps back, surveys with  s
Close scrutiny, then sharp critical glare  s
Only bloodshot eyes betray  b